Worlds of Making: Best Practices for Establishing a Makerspace for Your School by Laura Fleming

Worlds of Making: Best Practices for Establishing a Makerspace for Your School (Corwin Connected Educators Series)Worlds of Making: Best Practices for Establishing a Makerspace for Your School by Laura Fleming

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Corwin Connected Educators Series is a set of powerful little books covering specific topics in ways that educators can read a book one day and implement ideas the next. In this edition on makerspaces for school libraries, Fleming explains the necessary pieces of setting up a school makerspace (planning, aligning activities to standards, showcasing student work, and involving community experts) without bogging the reader down in details that could frequently change, such as equipment costs and suppliers. The focus stays on creating a maker culture in the school and starting at whatever level budget and administration allows. This book will be especially beneficial to librarians and educators interested in starting a makerspace but need to make the case and justify the value the space will bring. Fleming connects the dots between the learning that takes place in a makerspace and the initiatives so many are pushing for in education right now –increasing interest in STEM majors, fulfilling the goals of Common Core Standards, and connecting learning to the Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards and the Standards for the 21st Century Learner.

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The Maker Movement Manifesto by Mark Hatch

The Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and TinkerersThe Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and Tinkerers by Mark Hatch

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The word “makerspace” has existed for several years with a wide array of meanings. Mark Hatch starts this inspiring book with a manifesto centering on these concepts: make, share, give, learn, tool up, play, participate, support, and change. Each reader is encouraged to take this manifesto and change, adapt, and use it accordingly. This spirit of personalized innovation is what makes this book such a pleasure to read, as each chapter shares stories of individuals who have taken the idea of making to new levels with incredible results. Hatch makes a compelling case—similar to business gurus such as Seth Godin—that people should develop themselves and their talents on an individual basis rather than solely relying on the education system or corporations for validation. The book ends with a call to action—and it shouldn’t be a spoiler to share that the charge is to make! This exhilarating read will leave you excited about the possibilities that abound and also secretly wishing you lived in a city with a TechShop nearby.

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